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Parallel Tokyo: a devastated metropolitan

I grew up watching disaster movies, like The Day After Tomorrow and Sinking of Japan. Watching Sinking of Japan, I wondered how life is like in a disaster prone country like Japan. Having being living in it for quite some time, I feel that no one can always be adequately prepared should a disaster strikes, like the recently happened Typhoon Hagibis (commonly known in Japan as Typhoon No. 19).

NHK General TV is currently showing a drama series depicting a devastated Tokyo after a huge earthquake struck the metropolitan. The first episode of the series showed hours after the earthquake hit metropolitan at a few minutes after 4 p.m. at December 2, a fictitious television station and its reporters trying their best to report what was going on in Tokyo.

I was lucky to reach home early to watch the premiere episode at 7:30 pm. My first impression was its realistic depiction of a television station should a disaster happened. It instantly reminded me of Sinking of Japan.

A tweet promoting the drama series.

Titled “Parallel Tokyo”, this series depicted a disaster stricken Tokyo where it suffered a large magnitude of earthquake that rivaled 2011’s Great East Japan earthquake and its coming aftermath.

Trailer for the drama series “Parallel Tokyo” showed in the morning show Asaichi.

There is a 70 percent chance that a major earthquake will hit densely populated central Tokyo in the next 30 years. Millions of lives could be affected by collapsed buildings, power outages and other major damage.  … Official estimates show that about 23,000 people could be killed, and nearly 2 million homes destroyed, if a magnitude 7.3 earthquake strikes central Tokyo.

https://www3.nhk.or.jp/nhkworld/en/news/backstories/614/

Echoed by the statement above, various Japanese agencies are doubling their efforts to prepare for the disaster, including conducting drills, educating the public and raising awareness in general. 30 years might sound like a long time, but it might happen at anytime. For the Japanese, they may have no where to escape should a disaster with this scale happened. I can’t help but wonder, will the scene where the Japanese people seek refuge at other countries in the movie Sinking of Japan happen in the event a large scale disaster occurred? I sincerely hope not.

The drama series “Parallel Tokyo” premiered today at 7:30 pm and shows a new episode everyday throughout the week at 10:00 pm until Thursday (December 5). After episode 1 finished broadcasting, the announcer made remarks that I strongly agreed upon:

We’ve decided to broadcast this drama during this hour (7:30 pm time frame). Many people will find shocking scenes in this drama, including children who might be scared while seeing these scenes. Shocking as it may be, we felt that it is better to expose these now, and to facilitate in creating an atmosphere where family members can begin discussing how to take cautionary measures and making preparations in the event this disaster strikes.

If you are in Japan, and are interested in things related to disaster and disaster mitigation, I recommend this drama and its related documentary, scheduled to be broadcast in this Saturday (December 7). Be sure to turn on your television’s closed captions (CC) for the subtitles.

By Adrian Khor

Speaks Mandarin Chinese, English, Japanese, and Malay. Software developer based in Greater Tokyo, Japan. Specializes in .NET stack and C# at web and desktop development. Loves to listen to music, watching movies, reading books, and travel.

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