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COVID-19: When it all began

It was December 31, 2019.

I was in Taipei, resting in my room while watching the television. The news was reporting about some unknown pneumonia cases found in patients. These cases occurred at Wuhan, China. The fact that these cases were characterized as “unknown” made me alert and unease as I was outside Japan.

When the new year of 2020 began, I saw news where people who came to Taiwan who had departed from Wuhan must undergo screening if they have high fever. One of the main entry ports of Taiwan, Taoyuan International Airport, had implemented inspection and quarantine measures to ensure the situation do not escalate out of control.

A few days before I went back to Japan as the year-end holiday was about to end, I read news of a Chinese individual who had came back from Wuhan contracted fever and eventually got hospitalized. It made me wonder about the future of travel Japan and Taiwan, especially during long holidays, such as the Golden Week.

The entirety of January was full of news regarding the Wuhan pneumonia (precursor of COVID-19). The number of confirmed infected patients increased sharply, as well as the number of deaths as a result of the disease. Days before I departed back home for Chinese New Year, I saw news about the disease began spreading in Asia.

The day before Chinese New Year’s Eve.

The night when I departed back home from Chiba’s Narita International Airport, I saw news where people (especially Chinese citizens who were heading back home) hoarded face masks, sanitizers, and other items in huge bulks (think boxes) at various places in Japan, including pharmacies. This action caught me off guard as I didn’t fully realized the scale of the disease and its impact. Even the pharmacies in Narita International Airport had its masks all sold out.

Before I hopped the limited express train bound for Narita Airport, I bought a pack of face masks (and paid attention to buying those which had ability to repel bacterias and viruses) and took the initiative to wore it the entire journey.

How I wish I had bought more of those face masks beforehand. They were all sold out shortly.

Days before going back

Before I went back to Japan, I managed to secure several packs of face masks by purchasing each for RM8. Expensive, but desperate times along with extraordinary demands led to this outcome. Not willingly to take the risk, I bought several packs, just to be sure.

When my father and I visited the nearby pharmacies to buy some 3-ply face masks (or possible, N95 masks), we were met with disappointment when they told us the masks were all sold out.

Fast forward: March 2020

Face masks, hand sanitizers and the such are still largely absent in pharmaceutical stores. Waiting them to be restocked seemed to take forever. Lines were formed outside pharmacies hours before they opened, just to buy masks.

In my company, flexible work policy was implemented to permanent staffs (previously for contract workers, temp staff, and others), allowing them to work from home if necessary. Staffs were encouraged to come to work while avoiding the commuting peak hours.

However, I think that the awareness and actions taken were still not sufficient. The Hokkaido prefecture was its first large-scale victim. If the society do not adapt policies similar to its neighboring countries, I think a huge scale, nationwide infection might occur, especially when Tokyo Olympics 2020 being just around the corner.

I can’t help but wonder when will this pandemic ends. But one thing is for sure — if we do not cooperate to counter this disease, then it will surely be hard to mitigate. All things planned are effectively disrupted.

By Adrian Khor

Speaks Mandarin Chinese, English, Japanese, and Malay. Software developer based in Greater Tokyo, Japan. Specializes in .NET stack and C# at web and desktop development. Loves to listen to music, watching movies, reading books, and travel.

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